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gencaf View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Dog w/ warts
    Posted: 16 July 08 at 22:32

My 1 year old lab mix has developed warts on his chin and the outside of his lips. He is healthy otherwise, so I suspect it is from being vaccinated.

I gave him Thuja 30C as this seemed to match most, but they are not gone. Anyone have any suggestions about what might do the trick? They are spreading from him scratching them, so I fear soon they will be everywhere!

They are pink looking, raised warts- sort of look like cauliflower- they are bumpy.

He is mostly easy going. He gets excited for company and can be protective of the yard or house if strangers or other dogs come around. He does not like other dogs at all!

He is large 65 pounds, not really a very thirsty dog. He hopes to get table food, even though the only things he has ever gotten were dropped by my children.

He does not tolerate hot weather, in spite of being short-haired. He gets very hot with much panting and wants in quickly. He enjoys the cooler weather and will stay out a lot then.

Hope this helps with an answer.

Thank you!

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edebeukelaer View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 July 08 at 07:02

Hi gencaf,

A few things: warts are not a big health issue, warts can disappear by themselves after while (especially in young dogs), warts are not always easy to make disappear with homeopathy, prescriptions have to be really accurate. For the moment my opinion is that it is better to do nothing rather that make some prescriptions over the forum that are not going to be followed up.

If you really want to examine the problem of the warts on your dog, it is best to see a homeopathic practitioner who Will organise a proper follow up.

Best,

Edward

edward
homeopathy for the patient behind the symptoms.
edward@debeukelaer.fslife.co.uk
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taurus3 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Oct. 08 at 12:15
of course thuja helps in case of warts.
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edebeukelaer View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Oct. 08 at 13:58

dear Taurus,

I am not sure whether your observation is very helpful. I wish one could really make such simple statements in homeopathy but this were so, it would be a very inefficient type of medicine.

Edward

edward
homeopathy for the patient behind the symptoms.
edward@debeukelaer.fslife.co.uk
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LondonTimes View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Oct. 08 at 08:45
Originally posted by gencaf

warts on his chin and the outside of his lips.

pink looking, raised warts- sort of look like cauliflower- they are bumpy.

tolerate hot weather,

 
It is hard to rely on your observation (sign/symptoms). Case taking of layman like you and case taking of a homeopath does matter. A good case taking is half cured. To my sense, your dog needs a stat dose of Nit Acid (Warts on lips) in high potency.
Bureau Chief
Daily London Times Pakistan
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Oct. 08 at 09:01
For students: Differentiate b/w ulcer and Warts
 
While taking warts case see >
 
Warts location: limbs, face, fingers etc
color: red, brown,
Type: dry, fleshy, hard, outbreak, inflammed, smooth, SYPHYLITIC, due to poison effect
Shape: LONG, WRINKLED ETC
sensation: Painful, burning, sensitive, itching etc
Bureau Chief
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Ruby View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Nov. 08 at 19:41
  Warts in Dogs

Papilloma viruses are small, double-stranded DNA viruses of the Papovaviridae family. Some mammals have several distinct papilloma viruses—humans have >20; cattle, 6; dogs, 3; and rabbits, 2. Different papilloma viruses often have considerable species, site, and histologic specificity. The virus is transmitted by direct contact, fomites, and possibly by insects. Papillomas have been reported in all domestic animals, birds, and fish. Multiple papillomas (papillomatosis) of skin or mucosal surfaces generally are seen in younger animals and are usually caused by viruses. Papillomatosis is most common in cattle, horses, and dogs. Single papillomas are more frequent in older animals, but they may not always be caused by viral infection.

When lesions are multiple, they may be sufficiently characteristic to confirm the diagnosis; however, there are many simulants of warts, and a definitive diagnosis requires identification of the virus or its cytopathic effects on individual cells—a change known as koilocytic atypia or koilocytosis.

In dogs, 3 clinical presentations of canine papilloma virus infection have been described. The first is canine mucous membrane papillomatosis, which primarily affects young dogs. It is characterized by the presence of multiple warts on oral mucous membranes from lips to (occasionally) the esophagus and on the conjunctival mucous membranes and adjacent haired skin. 

When the oral cavity is severely affected, there is interference with mastication and swallowing. A viral etiology has been clearly established for these lesions. The second presentation is cutaneous papillomas, which are indistinguishable from the warts that develop on or around mucous membranes.   In dogs, we do not call these growths warts; we use the more formal term viral papilloma. These are benign skin tumors caused by the canine oral papilloma virus.

What do these papillomas look like?
Papillomas (Warts) in Dogs Viral papillomas are round but often have a rough, almost jagged surface reminiscent of a sea anemone or a cauliflower. They occur usually on the lips and muzzle of a young dog (usually less than 2 years of age). Less commonly, papillomas can occur on the eyelids and even the surface of the eye or between the toes. Usually they occur in groups rather than as solitary growths.

How is this virus transmitted?
The infection is transmitted via contact with the papillomas on an infected dog. The incubation period is 1 to 2 months. This virus can only be spread among dogs. It is not contagious to other pets or to humans.

Are viral papillomas dangerous?
Not really. They should go away on their own as the dog's immune system matures and generates a response against the papilloma virus. There have been two cases published where viral papillomas progressed to malignancy but this is extremely rare and by no means the usual course of the infection. Typically, it takes 1 to 5 months for papillomas to regress with oral growths tending to regress sooner than ocular growths. Occasionally some papillomas will stay permanently.

Sometimes oral papillomas can become infected with bacteria of the mouth. Hope you find the correct remedy to hasten your dogs recovery.  Big smile

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